Understanding Eczema: When Does It Not Go Away?

Eczema is a chronic skin condition that affects millions of people around the world. It is characterized by red, dry, itchy patches of skin that can be difficult to get rid of. While there is no known cure for eczema, there are treatments available to help manage the condition and reduce the severity of symptoms. In some cases, symptoms may go away for a while and then recur.

In other cases, the condition may last for weeks, months, or even years. It is important to understand the different types of eczema and how to treat them in order to manage the condition and reduce flare-ups.Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a common skin condition that usually begins during childhood and continues into adulthood. Symptoms may include red, dry, itchy patches of skin that can be painful and uncomfortable. In some cases, symptoms may disappear within a few weeks without treatment or with the use of hand lotion.

In other cases, the condition may last for months or even years. It is important to identify triggers that can cause flare-ups and take steps to avoid them.Dyshidrotic eczema is a certain form of this skin inflammation that causes mild to severe symptoms. It is characterized by small blisters on the hands and feet that can be itchy and uncomfortable. In some cases, symptoms may go away within a few weeks without treatment or with the use of hand lotion.

In other cases, the condition may last for months or even years.If you have persistent patches of red, dry, itchy skin that won't go away, you may have eczema or psoriasis. These skin conditions have similar symptoms, so it is often difficult to tell them apart. However, doctors often treat them in the same way. Treatment options include topical steroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors such as pimecrolimus (Elidel) or tacrolimus (Protopic), and stress management techniques.In some cases, areas of skin affected by discoid eczema may become permanently discolored after the condition has disappeared.

Home remedies such as cold compresses or baths with colloidal oats can help relieve itching and moisturize the skin. If you have difficulty getting rid of eczema with medication, your doctor may suggest that you try a food-elimination diet.Chronic eczema such as Atopic dermatitis can go into remission with the help of a good preventive treatment plan. While some people may emerge from eczema as they age, it is more important to consider this a chronic skin condition that has no cure. With proper treatment and avoidance of triggers, it is possible to manage eczema and reduce flare-ups.

Riya Hutchings
Riya Hutchings

On a quest to combat Contact Dermatitis!